Quantitative-Qualitative Friction Ridge Analysis: An Introduction to Basic and Advanced Ridgeology (Practical Aspects of Criminal & Forensic Investigations)

By in Evidence on February 21, 2013

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A thumb print left at the scene of a grisly murder. Fingerprints taken from a getaway car used in a bank robbery. A palm print recovered from the shattered glass door of a burglarized home. Indeed, where crimes are committed, careless perpetrators will invariably leave behind the critical pieces of evidence—most likely in the form of fingerprints—needed to catch and convict them. But the science of fingerprint identification isn’t always as cut and dry as detective novels and movies make it out to be.

Quantitative-Qualitative Friction Ridge Analysis, a new book in the ongoing Practical Aspects of Criminal and Forensic Investigations series, examines the latest methods and techniques in the science of friction ridge identification, or ridgeology. David R. Ashbaugh examines every facet of the discipline, from the history of friction ridge identification and its earliest pioneers and researchers, to the scientific basis and the various steps of the identification process.

The structure and growth of friction skin and how it can leave latent or visible prints are examined, as well as advanced identification methods in ridgeology, including Poroscopy, Edgeoscopy, Pressure Distortion and  Complex or Problem Print Analysis. The book, which features several detailed illustrations and photographs, also includes a new method for Palmar Flexion Crease Identification (palm lines) designed by the author and which has helped solve several criminal cases where fingerprints were not available. For crime scene technicians, forensic identification specialists, or anyone else pursuing a career in forensic science, this book is arguably the definitive source in the science of friction ridge identification.

3 thoughts on “Quantitative-Qualitative Friction Ridge Analysis: An Introduction to Basic and Advanced Ridgeology (Practical Aspects of Criminal & Forensic Investigations)

  1. Charles Brogdon
    1
    5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Ridgeology will change your life!, December 6, 2001
    By 
    Charles Brogdon (Tarrant County Texas) –

    This review is from: Quantitative-Qualitative Friction Ridge Analysis: An Introduction to Basic and Advanced Ridgeology (Practical Aspects of Criminal & Forensic Investigations) (Hardcover)

    If you are a latent print examiner, this book is an absolute must have. Friction ridge skin is unique and persistent. Ridgeolgy will give you a better understanding of friction ridge skin. The book also will also help you explain what you see when you make an identification. If you live in the world of point counters, this book will shock and amaze you. David Ashbaugh is a true visionary in the forensic identification world. This book should be in every crime scene investigator’s library.

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  2. 2
    3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Excellent!, May 10, 2002
    By 
    A. Turner
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Quantitative-Qualitative Friction Ridge Analysis: An Introduction to Basic and Advanced Ridgeology (Practical Aspects of Criminal & Forensic Investigations) (Hardcover)

    I don’t feel the need to reiterate the praises that have been given this book as to its usefulness for latent print examiners.

    I can say, however, that this book is great for students of forensic science (like myself) or the average reader as well. Unlike popular accounts of forensic science, it is not thrilling or adventurous. Those types of books will tell you that a person can leave a fingerprint at a scene, an investigator can find it, and then match it up in a database. Slim on the details, high on the “excitement” scale. And unlike the average MFS class, it is not dry, boring, and intended to give you only enough knowledge to do some damage.

    So, for those of us interested in how forensic science -actually- works, and in depth, this book is a great textbook covering all aspects of fingerprint analysis. It includes a particularly good chapter detailing nothing but the ways that fingerprints are formed in vitro – their creation, topology, and cross-section. It includes detail on the many ways that a print can be deposited, as well as the different substrates and surfaces they can be deposited on, and the types of distortion that each of these can cause. This book is not light reading, but if you are truly interested in learning more about how fingerprints work, and how analysts can identify them, then you should have no trouble enjoying this book.

    If I were to point out only one flaw, it would be that Ashbaugh’s agenda is too much in the fore. I would rather read about how fingerprints are analyzed than hear propaganda backing up the field as a legitimate science. His analysis in and of itself is adequate to illustrate the scientific principles underlying latent print analysis. It would have been more interesting for him to mention some of the reasons people believe that it is -not- a legitimate science, and refute those through simply through the precision of his text.

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  3. Andrew M. Roush
    3
    1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Understanding friction ridge, October 18, 2009
    By 
    Andrew M. Roush (Grafton, WV USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Quantitative-Qualitative Friction Ridge Analysis: An Introduction to Basic and Advanced Ridgeology (Practical Aspects of Criminal & Forensic Investigations) (Hardcover)

    Well worth reading if you are preparing for the IAI Certification Test. I have learned a tremendous amount of information from this book, from ACE-V to distortions in fingerprints. Recommend this book to anyone that works with fingerprints.

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