Communications Policy and the Public Interest: The Telecommunications Act of 1996

By in Communications on August 13, 2013

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The passage of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 inaugurated a new and highly volatile era in telecommunications. The first major overhaul of U.S.
communications law since 1934–when no one had a television set, a cordless phone, or a computer–the Act was spurred into being by broad shifts in technology use. Equally important, this book shows, the new law reflects important changes in our notions of the purpose of communications regulation and how it should be deployed. Focusing on the evolution of the concept of the public interest, Aufderheide examines how and why the legislation was developed, provides a thematic analysis of the Act itself, and charts its intended and unintended effects in business and policy. An abridged version of the Act is included, as are the Supreme Court decision that struck down one of its clauses, the Communications Decency Act, and a variety of pertinent speeches and policy arguments. Readers are also guided to a range of organizations and websites that offer legal updates and policy information.
 
Finalist, McGannon Center Award for Social and Ethical Relevance in Communication Policy Research

 

2 thoughts on “Communications Policy and the Public Interest: The Telecommunications Act of 1996

  1. Catherine McDowell
    1
    3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Communications Policy and the Public Interest, April 10, 2000
    By 
    Catherine McDowell (Richmond, VA: USA) –

    This review is from: Communications Policy and the Public Interest: The Telecommunications Act of 1996 (Paperback)

    I found this book to be an easy way to understand the policy and legislation passed by congress on the Telecommunications Act of 1996.

    This book helped to explain exactly what came out of this Act and where the act came from. It also gave a great understanding of where communications stands in America and what our main goals for the communications industry are.

    It was an excellent way to view what the gov’t wants out of the communications industry and what the future holds for the consumer.

    Great Buy!

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  2. 2
    1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    The Worst of Liberal Journalism, February 28, 2006
    By 
    Hans Boxer (Washington, D.C.) –

    This review is from: Communications Policy and the Public Interest: The Telecommunications Act of 1996 (Paperback)

    This book is a problem. It presents itself as book in the public interest, but it really does a disservice to the public. Gigantic corporations reaping billions of dollars off propaganda machines of immense proportion–this story should NOT be humanized or told in such simple form. Liberal journalists are the ones who will faithfully detail how and why your flesh is being flayed off your body by the corporate-government elite. Thank you, very much. By presenting all sides, we get no ground to stand upon, no point of view. We get some critical remarks tossed off next to corporate jargon about competition. Problem is, Aufderheide should have long agon seen beyond such a lame category as “competition.” If you want to see a real journalist in action, watch Bill Moyers examination of the 1996 telecommunications act in a video you can probably get at your library.

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