Copyright for Schools: A Practical Guide (Copyright Series)

By in Intellectual Property on February 7, 2013

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Copyright continues to be a timely topic as technology makes determining who owns what more and more complex. Written by the leading copyright authority for libraries, Copyright for Schools: A Practical Guide, Fifth Edition is a thoroughly updated version of the industry standard on copyright matters affecting schools.

Starting with an overview of copyright law, the book goes on to cover specific topics medium by medium, including print, software, music, video, multimedia, and more. It addresses new technologies in common use in schools and school libraries and also includes new cases and interpretations, statutory citations, guidance on best practices, and real life questions and answers to typical copyright dilemmas faced by schools. On the theory that preventing legal action is always simpler than defending it, the advice throughout is designed to enable schools to take advantage of their rights under copyright law, while avoiding the “bleeding edge” that may make them targets for copyright owners.

3 thoughts on “Copyright for Schools: A Practical Guide (Copyright Series)

  1. C. Pappas "Book Whisperer"
    1
    8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The Best Book on Copyright Issues for schools, April 2, 2000
    By 
    C. Pappas “Book Whisperer” (The Great Northwest) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    What an amazing book! Easy to use and indispensable if you are a school library media specialist. Hard to believe a book like this could be EXCITING, but it’s always nice to know when you are right and others are not so well informed. Use this book for all the black, white and gray areas of copyright issues. Should you make a “back up” copy of an audio tape? Is it okay to use photos off the web on a personal web page? This book will help you be a legal eagle with copyright issues in your school. Do you really know what “Fair Use” means? What about the legality with video tapes and multiple copies of other resources in the library collection. This highly informative and easy to comprehend book is invaluable as you try to wrap your brain around the complicated and complex copyright issues with print, media and the web. If you are a Library Media Specialist, add it to your personal or professional library.

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  2. 2
    1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Clear, concise and relevant copyright information, January 13, 2004
    By 
    John Ellis (Albany, NY United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Copyright and fair use can be very confusing issues, particularly in education. Many educators over-estimate their protections and privileges under fair use. This book is an ideal resource to help educators determine how copyright and fair use impact them. It clearly describes, with specific examples, what educators can and can not do with copyrighted materials. We purchased copies of the book for all of our academic buildings on campus so that all students and faculty could have access to this valuable resource.

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  3. 3
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    For all school administrators, school librarians, and teachers, February 26, 2012
    By 
    D. Williams “Donna Williams” (Covington, Texas) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Copyright for Schools: A Practical Guide (Copyright Series) (Paperback)

    Principals, teachers and school librarians, can you answer these questions correctly?

    1. What are the four factors for Fair Use in education when it comes to copyright law?
    2. What does copyright law say about the use of videos in the classroom?
    3. Under what circumstances is a teacher allowed to keep copies of students’ work to show as examples?
    4. How does one report suspected copyright violations?
    5. What are proper or improper uses of consumables? What is the definition of “consumables”? When is it permissible to make copies?

    Many teachers and librarians would not know the answers to these questions, and copyright law is an important issue. More and more schools are finding themselves in trouble over violations (knowing and unknowing) of copyright law.

    Granted, reading a book, even one as clearly-written as this one, does not make up for consulting a good copyright attorney if there is any doubt, but Simpson gives readers a good start with the fundamentals. The situations presented are very straightforward and to-the-point, and in plain English, not in legalese, with sidebars discussing common scenarios that could be troublesome.

    This, the fifth edition, goes deeper than earlier editions about distance learning and the TEACH Act, internet in schools, and school library exemptions.

    This book is very important reading for every school administrator, school librarian, or classroom teacher. I not only rate it five stars for its clarity, but I also say “required reading” for this audience.

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