Jeopardy in the Courtroom: A Scientific Analysis of Children’s Testimony

By in Witnesses on March 6, 2013

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This comprehensive resource helps the reader evaluate and understand children’s statements in the courtroom. Noting that in many instances testimony is elicited from children using questionable techniques that may be damaging to both defendant and accused, Ceci and Bruck describe procedures that will ensure that interviews and analysis are conducted in a sensitive and professional manager.

2 thoughts on “Jeopardy in the Courtroom: A Scientific Analysis of Children’s Testimony

  1. Jennifer P. Lee
    1
    17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The most important book in my libarary, January 31, 1999
    By 
    Jennifer P. Lee (Sandy, Utah United States) –

    This review is from: Jeopardy in the Courtroom: A Scientific Analysis of Children’s Testimony (Hardcover)

    This is the most important non-legal book in my library. Anyone who needs to evaluate the credibility of a child’s statement should read this book. Even-handed in its approach, it points out those factors most important to consider when assessing a child’s accusations.

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  2. William M. Grove
    2
    11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Data-driven and ethical forensic work, October 4, 2002
    By 
    William M. Grove (Woodbury, MN United States) –

    An excellent guide to the state of current knowledge about memory, suggestibility, and unsuitable vs. suitable information-eliciting techniques, with regard to children’s testimony. This book is distinguished from others on the same topic by the scientific reputations of the editors and chapter authors, as well as the cautious approach. Fits in very well with current Supreme Court strictures on the admissibility of expert/science based testimony—Daubert, Joiner, & Kumho decisions.

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